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July 26, 2011 / Omar J. Peters

Finding Downtown Beaverton

Great shortumentary on Beaverton, Oregon looking to find its downtown. Like too many cities, Beaverton developed in sprawl and is auto-oriented without an identifiable center place that is built towards people, but they’re trying to change that.

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July 25, 2011 / Omar J. Peters

ClockWork City

Well here is one concept on how to have better transportation within our cities: put it on a turntable!

“Clockwork City” is the fantastical vision of animator Roy Prol calling for a city of rotating rings that change the notion of getting around in large city. As the video notes, the 3,000 meter diameter “Clockwork City” won’t need cars or even transit since work and home are a mere minutes away, anywhere in the city. The city itself is in effect one large form of public transportation. To get to work, the video notes, “Just wait at home until you see your workplace closer.”

 

(via A|N Blog)

July 22, 2011 / Omar J. Peters

Tools for Moving to a New City: Maps

There are several great online sites/mobile apps that are priceless when looking to a relocate to a new city, or a new part of a city that go beyond the obligatory Google search, Wikipedia, and craigslist.

Want to see the new city closer? Try Google Maps Street View, Bing Maps Streetside, and Bing Maps Birds Eye View. Street View is priceless when it comes to walking around a city’s streets virtually. Google Street View has extensive coverage in cities across the U.S. and globally giving a great sense of what the city is like.  Similarly, Microsoft Bing’s Streetside (as posted on here) gives a clearly and more vibrant view of buildings along the street, but has poorer coverage. Where Bing Maps shine is in the Bird’s Eye View, giving a better and closer aerial view of the city, which can be rotated to see from different angles.

Downtown Dayton Birds Eye

July 21, 2011 / Omar J. Peters

Tools for Moving to a New City: Housing

There are several great online sites/mobile apps that are priceless when looking to a relocate to a new city, or a new part of a city that go beyond the obligatory Google search, Wikipedia, and craigslist.

Looking for housing in a new city? Try Padmapper. The website (and lesser featured mobile app) is a true map mashup. It takes apartment listings on craigslist, rent.com, apartments.com and more and places it on a Google Map. Information about the apartment’s Walkscore and Street View are included. Additionally, some area have added features to see crime statistics, neighborhood names/boundaries, and a Commute Overlay, a distance-to-location calculator (input an address, say workplace, and a distance buffer is added to the map showing what listings are within proximity).

Want to know what your neighbors would be like? Try Esri’s Tapestry Segmentation map (as earlier post here) to find out what TV shows your neighbors are prone to watch, and what stores they shop in.

July 20, 2011 / Omar J. Peters

Tools for Moving to a New City: Qwiki

There are several great online sites/mobile apps that are priceless when looking to a relocate to a new city, or a new part of a city that go beyond the obligatory Google search, Wikipedia, and craigslist.

Want to quickly learn about the new city? Try Qwiki. The video Wikipedia. Search for a city on Qwiki and it combs the interwebs for information, maps and pictures of that city and strings them together to create a quick 2-3 minute video that introduces basics about the city. For example, here’s Dayton, OH’s Qwiki.

July 19, 2011 / Omar J. Peters

Most Dangerous Cities for Pedestrians

Here is a map of the top 10 dangerous cities for pedestrians using data from the Transportation for America’s Dangerous by Design 2011 report.

The top 4 metro areas are in Florida! And all top 10 11 metros are in the South and South West.

July 18, 2011 / Omar J. Peters

America’s Worst Dressed Cities

GQ Magazine has compiled a list of the 40 worst dressed cities in the U.S.A, and they didn’t go easy. Here are the top 5.

  1. Boston
    It’s hard to be a fashion capital when half of your population is made up of undergraduate hoodie monsters, including those unfortunate coeds who don’t realize that leggings-as-pants were supposed to be paired with tops large enough to conceal their cameltoes. 
  2. Los Angeles
    Why should we expect Angelenos to ever recover from the aesthetic thrill of Ed Hardy? It’s smart if you think about it, why actually get a full body tattoo when you can buy the sartorial equivalent of one.
  3. Pittsburgh
    There is no city on Earth that can equal the utter sloppiness of Pittsburgh.
  4. Chicago
    The Parka Pierogi. Ingredients: Blown-out Nikes; torn cargoes; favorite novelty T-shirt; Bears/Bulls/Blackhawks hoodie—all wrapped up in a totally nondescript parka.
  5. Manhattan
    For every strike of greatness, there is an equal force of evil at work. Consider the Nine-Bro. You know, the pack of nine guys who walk down the street in unison, should-to-shoulder, outfitted in tacky black “Go Out” button-downs, embroidered denim, and product-inspired conflagrations on their head.

Other New York cities that made the list: Buffalo at #25 and Brooklyn at #11 .